Secretary-General of CITES

CITES Secretary-General's remarks at the briefing on Fisheries Regulatory Framework at the Multilateral Level - Geneva, Switzerland

Briefing on Fisheries Regulatory Framework at the Multilateral Level

Palais des Nations, Geneva

20 March 2017

The Role of CITES in the Fisheries Regulatory Framework at the Multilateral Level

John E. Scanlon, Secretary-General, CITES

Thank you Chair.

Distinguished Panelists

Exellencies, colleagues

CITES Secretary-General's opening remarks at the World Wildlife Day 2017 side event hosted by the United Kingdom, CITES and WCS - UN Headquarters, New York

CITES Secretary-General's opening remarks at UN General Assembly High-level thematic discussion on the global observance of World Wildlife Day 2017 - UN Headquarters, New York

Opening remarks of CITES Secretary-General, John E. Scanlon

UN Headquarters, New York, 3 March 2017

H.E. Mr. Peter Thomson, President of the UN General Assembly

Excellences

Distinguished panelists

Friends of wildlife

How the battle to axe the illegal timber trade is being won - External link to CITES Secretary-General's Op Ed

On January 2, new rules related to the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites) take effect, bringing hundreds of additional timber species under its legally binding global trade controls.
 
Conferences, declarations and reports highlight the scale of the challenge of sustainably and legally regulating trade in valuable timber. Yet, there is only one international agreement that obliges states across the value chain to ensure legal and sustainable trade in timber, and that is CITES.

CITES Secretary-General's opening remarks at the Livelihoods Workshop, 23 November 2016, George, South Africa

CITES and Livelihoods Workshop

Opening remarks by Mr John E. Scanlon, CITES Secretary-General

23 November 2016, George, South Africa

 

Deputy Director-General, Mr Shonisani Munzhedzi,

Distinguished guests and friends and colleagues from CITES Parties and international organizations,

CITES Secretary-General's Intervention at Hanoi Conference on Illegal Wildlife Trade - Hanoi, Vietnam


Hanoi Conference on Illegal Wildlife Trade

Intervention by John E. Scanlon, Secretary-General, CITES

Plenary Session

17-18 November 2016 – Hanoi, Vietnam

 

Hon. Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development of Vietnam, Dr. Ha Cong Tuan
Hon. Ministers
Distinguished guests
Friends and colleagues

CITES Secretary-General's remarks on the destruction of confiscated elephant ivory and rhino horn in Viet Nam


Remarks on the destruction of confiscated elephant ivory
and rhino horn in Hanoi, Viet Nam

John E. Scanlon, CITES Secretary-General

12 November 2016

 

Mr. Ha Cong Tuan, Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development
Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen

CITES CoP17 – A CoP of “Firsts” and a Turning Point for the World’s Wildlife - External link to CITES Secretary-General's Op Ed

In every corner of our planet, a variety of threats such as habitat loss, climate change, over-exploitation and illegal trade put intense pressure on wild populations of animals and plants.

Illicit trafficking in wildlife now takes place at an industrial scale driven by transnational organized criminal groups. The phenomena poses a real and immediate danger to some of our most precious species.

A Virtuous Cycle for Conservation - External link to CITES Secretary-General's Op Ed

NEW YORK – Poor and rural people around the world rely on plants and animals for shelter, food, income, and medicine. In fact, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG 15) on sustainable ecosystems acknowledges many developing societies’ close relationship with nature when it calls for increased “capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities.” But how is this to be achieved?

COP17 is a game-changer - External link to CITES Secretary-General's Op Ed

In every corner of the world, wild plants and animals are under intense pressure as a result of habitat destruction, climate change, over-exploitation and illegal trade, which is taking place on an industrial scale. This is why, at the start of CITES #CoP17, I said the Johannesburg World Wildlife Conference was ‘critical’ to securing the future of wildlife.

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