http://cites.org/eng en CITES’ Virtual College reopens http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/131705_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>The CITES Virtual College has been updated and relaunched.<img alt="Virtual College Homepage" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5d3c5145-fc8d-442c-abf9-21da2dcc9b0a" height="288" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/CITES_Virtual_College_cover.png" width="528" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>This web-based library and learning resource (<a href="https://cites.org/eng/virtual-college">https://cites.org</a><a href="https://cites.org/eng/virtual-college">/eng/virtual-college</a>) offers the opportunity to get easy access to a wealth of information and to learn about, and better understand, the workings of the Convention and how it regulates the international trade in endangered species of Fauna and Flora.</p> <p>The Virtual College originally came into being in 2011 and was developed with the financial support of the European Union, with expert contributions from Spain and the International University of Andalusia (UNIA). This update gives it new functionality, easier navigation and makes it more mobile-friendly.</p> <p>It includes identification guides, reference materials and a comprehensive look at one of CITES’ unique tools, the Non-Detriment Finding (NDF) – where authorities carry out studies to ensure that a potential trade does not adversely impact the conservation of the species. Over the next months, additional training materials will be added designed to help CITES Management and Scientific Authorities run workshops and courses that give both an introduction to the Convention and a more in-depth view of how it works. .</p> <p>This updated version is available in the three official languages of the Convention, (Spanish, French and English). All materials are organized and categorized for easy reference, to make the sure it’s user-friendly for both expert and non-experts and all materials are easily searchable through either keywords or advanced searches. As it’s web-based, it can be used by anyone who has an internet connection on computer or mobile phone, as individual users or groups. It’s also open to those who have no formal connection to CITES or its implementation but who are interested in the workings of one of the world’s most successful multilateral agreements.</p> <p><img alt="Virtual College web page" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dbe7f217-51fe-40a3-bef0-e582d8971cf3" height="319" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/CITES_Virtual_College_IDMaterials.png" width="563" class="align-left" loading="lazy" />The upgrades to the course material are still on-going and new materials will be added as they become available. More online courses are under development and they will be fitted in to the new design in the coming months. Once complete, the Virtual College will be the most complete guide to CITES and its implementation that exists and it will contribute significantly to ensuring that international trade in endangered species of animals and plants is legal, sustainable and traceable.</p> <p>CITES Secretary-General, Ivonne Higuero, believes this updated resource will attract widespread use, “CITES has been effective at regulating the World’s Wildlife Trade for nearly fifty years thanks to the knowledge and expertise of those who implement it. This updated Virtual College provides the tools for that effective implementation and will continue to help develop the expertise of those who take us forward into our next fifty years.” </p> <p>This latest upgrade to the Virtual College is being made possible through a financial contribution from the Swiss government.</p> <p>CITES is one of the multilateral environmental agreements that is working to conserve species and biodiversity. It has been nearly universally accepted by the countries of the world with 184 signatory Parties (including the European Union).</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Fri, 24 Jun 2022 08:56:57 +0200 davidw 131705 Blue BioTrade in the Caribbean http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/131122_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>A new packet of measures designed to promote legal and sustainable trade, and bring economic benefits to<img alt="Queen Conch shell in the Caribbean Sea" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="04dfd156-3a61-4246-a7e3-a51ed3ced6c9" height="265" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/shutterstock_1832814697.jpg" width="398" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>local communities in the East Caribbean fishing industry, under the Blue BioTrade Project is being discussed this week. The 2 day meeting, which is being held on the island country of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, is reviewing the results of an 18 month project designed to examine the business potential of trade in Blue BioTrade products from three Eastern Caribbean countries (Grenada, Saint Lucia and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines) and the sustainable fishing of queen conch, an iconic local species.</p> <p><br /> The Queen Conch is a seafood delicacy, which also has important non-food therapeutic and handicraft uses. For a number of years, its harvesting and trade was improperly regulated, leading to a sharp decline in numbers throughout its range.The Blue BioTrade Project has been helping fishers work more sustainably and within the existing trade rules to improve their livelihoods and the local economy. The project has been a collaboration between the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of wild fauna and flora (CITES) and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). In partnership, they launched the Blue Bio Trade Project that aims to give small-scale producers from the target countries improved incomes, access to new markets, while at the same time ensuring that the queen conch species (Strombus gigas) is being more sustainably managed.</p> <p><br /> The project was launched just over eighteen months ago and funded through the European Union and the OECS. It has involved research and the drawing-up of evidence-based policy solutions and now has a plan of action to help local industry and help protect local biodiversity.<br /> The queen conch is a CITES Appendix II-listed species, which means that its trade should be subject to regulations compatible with legal, traceable and sustainable use. The global market of this sea mollusc or shellfish was estimated at USD74 million in 2017 and continues to grow.</p> <p><br /> While its global demand is booming, the Project believes that small-scale coastal producers in the eastern Caribbean are not fully seizing the breadth of opportunities offered by sustainable queen conch markets.<br /> CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero said that, in the wake of mounting and global concerns about people’s relationship with nature, the project would “promote long-term sustainability of the use of and trade in queen conch, and the well-being of local communities that rely on fisheries for their livelihoods.”</p> <p><br /> In many locations, early, uncontrolled harvesting of queen conch has resulted in overfishing, illegal landings and a rapid deterioration of stocks. This is why it has been listed in CITES Appendix II since 1992. That Appendix includes species that are not necessarily threatened with extinction, but for which international trade must be controlled to avoid utilization incompatible with their survival.</p> <p><br /> Key supply-side concerns in the queen conch value chain include the absence of traceability systems and limited landing and trade data. Equally of concern is the limited understanding and use of CITES requirements and processes, such as the issuing of trade permits, as well as the lack of common handling practices and sanitary standards and no official organizations to represent the fishers’ interests.</p> <p><br /> UNCTAD, OECS and CITES have joined forces to map and prioritize these concerns and seek to address them. The meeting in St Vincent and the Grenadines this week will involve all interested parties and will hope to agree the plans to move forward with sustainable trade under the Blue Bio Trade Project banner.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 23 May 2022 18:28:15 +0200 davidw 131122 Email invitations purporting to come from the CITES Secretariat http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/131093_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p><strong>Geneva, 17 May 2022</strong> - The CITES Secretariat has been made aware that fake email invitations to accept an award letter have recently been sent using the name of the CITES Secretary-General as the original sender. A sample of such an invitation is shown below:</p> <img alt="cites message email" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="843190df-9875-4a65-b4f0-00e7d6060381" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/17052022_cites_message_email.jpg" class="align-center" width="198" height="329" loading="lazy" /> <p>The Secretariat wishes to inform all CITES Parties and other relevant stakeholders, including the Committee members of the Standing Committee, as well as the representatives of the Permanent Missions to the United Nations Office at Geneva, that such emails are not sent from the CITES Secretariat or any of its staff. The Secretariat recommends not to open or reply to such emails, open attachments, or follow any hyperlinks contained therein.</p> <p>Parties and other relevant stakeholders are advised to check closely for any irregular communication purporting to originate from the Secretariat. If in doubt, you may wish to contact the Secretariat through a separate email to <a href="mailto:info@cites.org">info@cites.org</a>, or by other means of communication, such as telephone.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Tue, 17 May 2022 16:50:30 +0200 shashika 131093 Happy Earth Day - Happy Mother Earth Day http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130871_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>Mother Earth Day message - April 2022<br /> From CITES Secretary-General, Ivonne Higuero</p> <p>Happy Mother Earth Day to you.<img alt="CITES Secretary-General" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a4485676-0143-41b5-8985-60fadc81e4dd" height="183" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/CITES-SG-Ivonne-Higuero_S.jpg" width="173" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /><br /> For many thousands of years, there have been peoples and cultures that have recognized the importance of Mother Earth and looked to it as a nurturing and sustaining force and one that needs and deserves our respect.<br /> Over the past few years, we have come to reach a scientific consensus that this view of the earth is the only one that will ensure our long-term future. We must protect our biodiversity and our ecosystems and when we use the resources nature gives us, it must be in a sustainable way.<br /> The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development sets out a vision for a world in which humanity lives in harmony with nature, and in which wildlife and other living species are conserved.<br /> Mother Earth Day reminds us that we are in a partnership with our planet and that comes with obligations. We thank the Plurinational State of Bolivia for taking the lead in creating this International Day that reminds us to safeguard our shared natural environment, our shared home.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Fri, 22 Apr 2022 22:59:28 +0200 davidw 130871 Viet Nam considers conservation plan for two of its most valuable tree species http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130853_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>Vietnamese Authorities are considering a management and conservation plan for two of their most valuable native tree species. The plans, which have been proposed by the Center for Nature Conservation and Development (CCD) Viet Nam, are for the two species of rosewood (<em>Dalbergia cochinchinensis</em> and <em>Dalbergia oliveri). </em>They are among the most sought-after trees in international trade for high-end furniture and decorative products. The wood has a high commercial value and is well-known for durability, corrosion and termite resistance and has been extensively used in construction and furniture making. As a result, both tree species have been the most heavily exploited and traded species in Viet Nam and many other countries. The wild populations are now small and fragmented and without proper conservation and restoration measures, are at high risk of extinction in many parts of the country.<img alt="Dalbergia" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="e6a49aa6-2168-475b-90b2-2635f0ac1fa8" height="323" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/VN2_0.jpg" width="323" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>Over the past 20 years, international trade and demand for precious timbers in the genus <em>Dalbergia</em> have increased dramatically in the East Asian markets, leading to over-exploitation and illegal trade in all areas of their distribution, not only in Viet Nam and Southeast Asian countries but also in Africa and South America.</p> <p>In Viet Nam, there is currently no conservation programme for this group of species and no concentrated planting area to create an alternative supply of these species from the wild. At present, <em>D. cochinchinensis</em> and <em>D. oliveri </em>have been exhaustedly exploited in their natural distribution areas and only a few small populations remain, which are being strictly protected in national parks and nature reserves. Even so, they are still facing risks of illegal logging and land-use conversion which cannot be restored. The species have a slow growth rate, so they are rarely selected as plant species for main afforestation and restoration programs. Only in a few places have <em>D. cochinchinensis</em> and <em>D. oliveri </em>been piloted for plantation and forest enrichment and only in small areas for research or experimentation purposes.</p> <p>The proposed management and conservation plan will take in urgent, medium-term and long-term activities that will run until 2035. It will involve an initial stocktaking and measuring of all the wild populations, mapping where they are and developing a digital database for effective sharing and use of all the information that will be gathered. From there additional programmes will be developed to produce seeds for new forests and reforestation. The proposed plan have set out targets to pilot the planting of at least ten hectares of both the species, enriching 100 hectares of natural forests, and zoning 200 hectares with assisted natural regeneration.</p> <p><img alt="Dalbergia" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2e034f70-d16d-4973-844e-cf029f961db0" height="259" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/VN1_0.jpg" width="259" class="align-left" loading="lazy" />All the proposed conservation efforts in the various parts of the country will also be monitored, using high-tech equipment.</p> <p>The plan has been designed to work heavily with local populations and the Vietnamese public to stress the importance of the rosewood tree species, of using them sustainably and the importance of combatting the illegal trade, using community conservation teams and community forest protection teams.</p> <p>Viet Nam is one of the top 25 countries in the world in terms of biodiversity, with about 20,000 species of plants, 3,000 species of fish, more than 1,000 species of birds, and over 300 species of mammals. However, it has been facing serious biodiversity loss due to deforestation and forest degradation as well as illegal hunting, logging, and international trade in wild plants and animals.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 18 Apr 2022 10:28:44 +0200 davidw 130853 Secretary-General&#039;s opening remarks at the Regional Forum on Sustainable Development 2022 - Geneva, Switzerland http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130832_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>On the occasion of the Regional Forum on Sustainable Development for the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Region – Coordinated by UNECE and The International Telecommunication Union</p> <p>CITES Secretary-General, Ivonne Higuero, on ‘Building Digital Ecosystems’. Delivered in Geneva on 6 April 2022.</p> <p>It is an honor for me to speak on this very important topic - thanks to UNECE and ITU for the invitation.</p> <p>Excellencies, dear delegates, before I speak about the topic of the session, allow me to provide some background on CITES.<strong> </strong>The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora or CITES is a legally binding, multilateral environmental agreement with 184 Parties.</p> <p>The overall objective of the Convention is to ensure that international trade in these species is sustainable, legal and traceable to ensure their survival in the wild, providing opportunities for sustainable trade and economic development, particularly in developing countries and benefitting local communities.</p> <p>It may surprise you that CITES regulates the international trade of more than 38,000 species. This regulation of international trade in CITES specimens is through a permitting system – trade in Appendix I species (about 3 percent of CITES listed species) is very restricted and trade in Appendix II species (about 97 percent of CITES listed species) is allowed only if certain conditions are met.</p> <p>I believe that innovation in digitalization can play an important role to accelerate efforts to achieve the CITES objective. Greater uptake of digital solutions and advanced technologies like blockchain will create tremendous value to bolster transparency and traceability; as well as decrease the possibility of corruption throughout the process of authorized trade of specimens in CITES-listed species.</p> <p>Now, let me share some food for thought about moving towards greater digitalization of CITES trade processes.</p> <ul> <li>First, we must recognize the contexts and the inherent challenges and needs of many of our Parties; each Party must designate national Management and Scientific Authorities but there may be lack of ICT-readiness within these Authorities or their peer agencies, especially in developing countries and in countries with economies in transition. The need for investments and building digital skills should be addressed, too.</li> <li>Second, we need to continue building on the appetite for digital solutions and must engage more with various stakeholders including the CITES Management and Scientific Authorities, customs, border agencies, enforcement authorities or other related bodies.</li> <li>Third, we must continue to innovate. Innovation is essential in consolidating and strengthening existing solutions. This is where advanced technologies like blockchain can play an important role. I am happy to share that a few Parties are already exploring the use of blockchain in their e-permitting systems.</li> <li>Fourth, we need to have more Parties exchanging permit data. This means we need to develop inter-operable digital systems based on international standards. I should mention that pilot exchanges have been taking place since 2017, first launched by Switzerland and France. And the European Commission is at the final stages of developing a system for EU member states. I am happy to note the collaboration between UNECE, ESCAP and UNCTAD for supporting a few other countries. Continued partnerships of international organizations to CITES Parties based on their expertise is more than welcome.</li> <li>Last but not least, we need to develop functioning partnerships nationally, regionally and internationally.</li> </ul> <p>Digital solutions work best when trade processes are coordinated and harmonized among national agencies. A case in point for CITES is cooperation between the national customs agencies and their regulatory requirements vis-à-vis the CITES Management Authorities and their requirements for control.</p> <p>With the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen the appetite to move towards digitalization or virtual means of trade. There is no denial that the transition to a digital process also means less exposure to risks and increased resilience to future pandemics or other shocks. For CITES, expanding into a full-fledged electronic CITES agenda will take us steps closer to achieving the objective of making trade legal, sustainable, and traceable.</p> <p>Thank you again.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Wed, 06 Apr 2022 17:22:19 +0200 shashika 130832 Trade ban proposed to conserve one of Africa&#039;s most exploited tree species http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130803_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p><img alt="Pterocarpus erinaceus" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="81aca294-1b55-4c58-a328-f2449ce1a7d7" height="306" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/21.%20Pterocarpus%20erinaceus%20%C2%A9Ji-Elle%20CC%20BY-SA%204.0%20via%20Wikimedia%20Commons.jpg" width="204" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>One of west Africa’s most exploited tree species could be given additional emergency protection to reduce the threat of extinction. <em>Pterocarpus erinaceus</em>, also known as kosso or barwood, is found in west and central Africa. It’s used for woodworking, medicine, fuel and animal feed and is protected under CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. The 16 member states of CITES where the tree species is known to grow, have one month to respond before the emergency measures come into force preventing all international trade.</p> <p><br /> <em>Pterocarpus erinaceus</em> is listed in Appendix II of CITES, which means its international trade is strictly controlled to prevent it becoming a threat to its survival. Recent studies have shown that illegal harvesting and trade have further reduced numbers of the trees in the wild and this triggered the extra measures.</p> <p><br /> Unless there are any objections, a complete trade suspension will come into force on the 27th of April to ensure the sustainability and viability of the remaining trees. In the meantime, all states that import <em>Pterocarpus erinaceus</em> are being urged to reject any export permits for shipments arriving at their borders and stop any further trade in this species.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 28 Mar 2022 17:45:00 +0200 davidw 130803 CITES celebrates International Forests Day http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130772_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>Today we celebrate International Forests Day and at the same time recognize how essential forests are for<img alt="Dalbergia" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4812f9fd-09af-4d07-aeca-7c9867a67d29" height="223" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/22.%20Dalbergia%20retusa%20%C2%A9David%20J.%20Stang%20CC%20BY-SA%204.0%20via%20Wikimedia%20Commons_1.jpg" width="335" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /> planetary health and human well-being.</p> <p>Our forests filter our water, clean our air and provide a home to wildlife. They are crucial in the fight against climate change and they provide food, energy, jobs and income for billions of people worldwide.</p> <p>The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora regulates international trade in more than 500 tree species to ensure their survival.</p> <p>More than a third of all tree species are threatened. The main problems come from deforestation for building or to create extra agricultural land or logging for commercial purposes.</p> <p>The CITES Tree Species Programme (CTSP) was set up to provide financial assistance to countries in conservation and management measures to ensure that their trade in timber, bark, extracts and other products from CITES-listed tree species is sustainable, legal and traceable. It works across Asia, Africa, Central and South America and the Caribbean. For example, it is working to protect a number of rosewood species. These trees are prized for their wood, which is beautiful and durable and is made into furniture and musical instruments. Due to their popularity, several of the rosewood species have been overharvested and a recent CTSP-funded study has prompted Viet Nam to stop all wild harvesting and exports of Siamese and Burmese Rosewoods. International trade in a species should never pose a threat to its survival. In Viet Nam the study showed that continued trade could pose just such a risk and so a moratorium on international trade has been put in place for at least the next five years.</p> <p>The Lower Mekong Region is home to 100 CITES-listed tree species. Since February 2021 to date, the CITES Secretariat and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have been working on a project that has increased the region’s capacities on sustainability, legality and traceability of CITES Appendix-II timber species of rosewoods, yew and agarwood. The Secretariat is also coordinating research to improve knowledge on the biology and trade of valuable tree species such as rosewoods and frankincense, in support of decision making related to sustainable trade.</p> <p>It is this kind of work, targeting overexploitation of tree species that is crucial to making sure that consumption and production is sustainable – the theme of this year’s International Forests Day. Managed properly, forests are a renewable resource and more than a billion people depend upon them either for their livelihoods or for the variety of products that can be produced from them.</p> <p>International Days are designed to be a focus for attention but in this case they should also remind us that Forest conservation is a constant battle. We need to remember that they are essential for our survival and earth’s well-being. There are steps that each of us can take to help: plant or adopt trees, save water and energy, reduce, reuse and recycle and where possible, buy sustainable goods. There’s one more thing you can do too, go out and enjoy the forests you may have around you: walk, run, play, picnic and most of all appreciate them. </p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 21 Mar 2022 14:23:01 +0100 davidw 130772 SC74 in Lyon – The Delegates’ Verdict http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130769_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p><strong><u>SC74 in Lyon – The Delegates’ Verdict</u></strong></p> <img alt="Delegates from SC74" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4b7aa265-384c-4839-a32f-d7137d3eb568" height="404" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/delegates_0.jpg" width="720" class="align-center" loading="lazy" /> <p>Shereefa AL SALEM, Rhedyn OLLERENSHAW, Flore KOUMBA PAMBO</p> <p><strong><u>How did the meeting go?</u></strong></p> <p>Flore KOUMBA PAMBO (FKP) – Delegate from Gabon:</p> <p><em>It was a great success. We’ve had a few meetings on-line and for me it has been truly important to get back to consolidating the links within the CITES family. Unfortunately, not all Parties could make it here – because of the health restrictions but let’s hope for the CoP we can truly be all together to work to conserve wild fauna and flora. (CoP - The meeting of the Conference of the Parties, in November in Panama)</em></p> <p>Shereefa AL SALEM (SAS) – Delegate from Kuwait</p> <p><em>It went great – there were long days with late sessions but of course the Chair (Carolina Caceres, Chair of the Standing Committee) is one of the best to handle the subjects neutrally. Yes, it was perfect. </em></p> <p><em>It’s not just about the agenda or the subjects themselves it’s about the communication between the countries and the Secretariat, the IGOs, the NGOs. Sometimes these face-to-face meetings create more MOUs and collaboration between countries (MOUs Memoranda of Understanding).</em></p> <p>Rhedyn OLLERENSHAW (RO) – Delegate from Australia</p> <p><em>I think it’s been an extremely productive meeting given the enormous agenda. It’s been really positive; everyone’s enjoyed being back together again. It’s a testament to the community that we came together so quickly and really got down to work.</em></p> <p><strong><u>What will you take away from the meeting?</u></strong></p> <p>SAS - <em>It’s a real experience and a wonderful exchange of information. I met people within my region and outside it that have given me insights and understanding and that will make a big difference.</em></p> <p>RO - <em>The energy of the room is what I’ll take away from here. Even though we had a lot of work to do everyone was really well-humored. Given that the days were long everyone was still really committed to getting the work done - even late in the night.</em></p> <p>FKP - I <em>really felt that this time there was even more consensus than usual around the discussions. I don’t know whether it’s COVID but people seemed very concise. I’m the Chair of the Plants Committee and I felt that there was less friction and more consensus and I think this augurs well for the CoP</em></p> <p><strong><u>What would your advice be to someone who is just starting with their first committee meeting?</u></strong></p> <p>SAS - <em>Collaborate within your region and get an idea of how you can work together and unify your position. Address any issues with the countries concerned – we had the chance to do that with the CITES Secretariat before the meeting even started and that was very useful. It’s been great.</em></p> <p>FKP - <em>My best advice for someone coming to Standing Committee for the first time is to listen. Stop, listen and try to understand what’s going on. For me, this is how it was. It wasn’t until my third committee that I managed to say something to represent my country.</em></p> <p>RO - <em>Ask lots of questions from all the people around. Pay attention to the patterns and rhythms of the room. Look at the way people connect with each other and the fission and fusion relationships in the room – that’s the way you find your relationships and you find your like-minded people and you understand the different perspectives.</em></p> <p><strong><u>Was it good to have the meeting in person, rather than the remote meetings that have been taking place?</u></strong></p> <p>SAS <em>– It was fantastic; direct contact between the countries and the Secretariat; any questions can be addressed there and then and face to face.</em></p> <p>FKP - <em>It was harder work being here but more rewarding and more productive. You have the time to learn to relate to each other, reach consensus and solve problems. Online just doesn’t compare.</em></p> <p>RO - <em>I think being able to look people in the eye, that’s a benefit or even watching Carolina and seeing how she reacts to things or how the secretariat is reacting to things, being able to talk to people in between sessions and build bonds, you just don’t get that on a screen.</em></p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 21 Mar 2022 11:01:56 +0100 davidw 130769 Viet Nam stops harvesting and exports of two species of endangered rosewood http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130760_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>Viet Nam is to stop all harvesting and exports of two species of endangered rosewood tree.<img alt="Siamese Rosewood" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2c5b59b2-b3fd-462a-85c3-6a6516b8e409" height="248" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/shutterstockrosewoodsm_0.jpg" width="330" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>The two tree species (<em>Dalbergia cochinchinensis</em> and <em>Dalbergia oliveri) </em>are both listed on Appendix II of CITES (the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), which recognizes that they are threatened and that their use needs to be strictly regulated to ensure that it poses no risk to the species’ survival. The CITES implementing authorities in Viet Nam undertook a study, which was carried out under the CITES Tree Species Programme, into the local health of the two species. It found that populations of both species are ‘small and fragmented’ and recognized that further trade may pose a risk to their survival in the wild. Viet Nam therefore decided to prohibit all harvesting and export of these rosewoods from the wild for the next five years.</p> <p>The rosewoods have been part of a booming timber trade in recent decades – the Siamese rosewood (<em>Dalbergia cochinchinensis</em>) – has been heavily in demand for making luxury furniture products. Both species have been illegally exploited in Viet Nam for international commerce for many years because their wood is considered very hard, beautiful and durable. Consequently, wild populations have declined dramatically.</p> <p>Viet Nam is one of the world’s richest countries in terms of biodiversity, with nearly 15 million hectares of forests. However, it has been facing serious biodiversity loss due to deforestation and forest degradation as well as illegal hunting, logging and trade in wild plants and animals. CITES listing of endangered species is aimed at ensuring that all trade in these species is legal, sustainable and traceable. The hope is that with the new ban the two rosewood species will be allowed to recover in the wild. A further study will be carried out in 2027 to review the situation.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:53:51 +0100 davidw 130760 SC74 meeting in Lyon ends after 5 packed days http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130738_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>End of CITES SC74 meeting throws spotlight onto next World Wildlife Conference in Panama<img alt="Logo of SC74" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="07fc7c86-152d-4ebd-ad11-068004ee537e" height="223" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Closing%20pic.png" width="155" class="align-right" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>Lyon, 11 March 2022: More than four hundred delegates and observers from around the world, are on their way home tonight at the end of the five days of CITES’ Standing Committee’s 74<sup>th</sup> meeting (SC74).</p> <p>The meeting was critical in paving the way towards the meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP19) – CITES’ ultimate decision-making body - which this year meets in Panama in November.</p> <p>The agenda for the five-day SC74 was the longest ever and the resolutions and decisions that will now go to CoP19 for approval include: further consideration on the trade in live elephants, a recommendation that CITES should apply to specimens produced through biotechnology, further work on compliance and implementation of CITES in Central and West Africa and a recommendation that further work was needed on how CITES can contribute to reducing the risk of future zoonotic disease emergence.</p> <p>There was also agreement that further work would be needed on the conservation of eels, corals, seahorses, queen conch, sharks and rays, marine turtles, West African vultures, big cats (lions, tigers jaguars etc.), pangolins, as well as rosewood and orchids. CITES is known as a Convention with both carrots and sticks; at SC74 urgent measures relating to trade in West African rosewood were agreed, to ensure that the current plundering comes under control. The Committee also agreed to maintain compliance measures with respect to Lao PDR, Guinea, Democratic Republic of Congo and Nigeria, and agreed to revisit potential compliance issues in China, Cameroon, European Union and United Kingdom and Viet Nam, at a later stage.</p> <p>The Committee also agreed to the registration of an aquaculture centre in Mexico for the farmed production of Totoaba fish expected to reduce the illegal trade in totoaba.</p> <p>The Standing Committee is the body that advises and makes recommendations to the Conference of the Parties of CITES (the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). CoP happens every three years and brings together representatives from all 184 Parties to the Convention.</p> <p>The Chair of the Standing Committee, Carolina Caceres (Canada), highlighted the cooperative spirit that allowed this SC74 to get through the lengthy agenda, “I must pay tribute to the intelligent, diligent, respectful and efficient way that delegates worked through the discussions. It was certainly a challenge, but I know that the work we have done here in Lyon puts us in good stead for the Conference of Parties to come in November of this year.” </p> <p>Ivonne Higuero, Secretary-General of CITES, said “This is an important year for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use and CITES is contributing to address the biodiversity crisis. We have covered a lot of ground during SC74 and worked hard over the five days of this meeting. It has left us in a strong position for our upcoming meeting of the Conference of the Parties. This year it is in Panama from November 14th to the 25th where we will be taking crucial decisions as part of our mission to regulate the international trade in the wild fauna and flora that we are pledged to conserve.“</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Note to editors:</strong></p> <p>For further information or interview requests, please contact: David Whitbourn at +41 79 477 0806 or <a href="mailto:cites-media@un.org">cites-media@un.org</a></p> <p><strong>About CITES</strong></p> <p><em>With 184 Parties, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) remains one of the world's most powerful tools for wildlife conservation through the regulation of trade. Thousands of species are internationally traded and used by people in their daily lives for food, health care, housing, tourist souvenirs, cosmetics or fashion.</em></p> <p><em>CITES regulates international trade in over 38,000 species of plants and animals, including their products and derivatives, to ensure their survival in the wild with benefits for the livelihoods of local people and the global environment. The CITES permit system seeks to ensure that international trade in listed species is sustainable, legal and traceable</em> <em>and </em><em>contributes </em><em>to both the livelihoods of the communities that live closest to them and to national economies for a healthy planet and the prosperity of the people in support of UN Sustainable Development Goals</em><em>.</em></p> <p><em>CITES was signed in Washington D.C. on 3 March 1973 and entered into force on 1 July 1975.</em></p> <p> </p> <p><em>Learn more about CITES by visiting </em><a href="https://cites.org/eng/"><em>www.cites.org</em></a><em> or connecting to:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/CITES">www.facebook.com/CITES</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.flickr.com/CITES">www.flickr.com/CITES</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.twitter.com/CITES">www.twitter.com/CITES</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/c/CITES">www.youtube.com/c/CITES</a></li> </ul> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 14 Mar 2022 10:43:45 +0100 davidw 130738 New wildlife data visualisation platform reveals trends in international trade in endangered species http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130726_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <a href="https://tradeview.cites.org"><img alt="cites_wildlife_tradeview.png " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="e51b376a-0732-4deb-96c4-3900988f1783" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cites_wildlife_tradeview.png" style="text-align: center; margin: 10px auto 20px;&#10; display: block;" class="align-center" width="714" height="433" loading="lazy" /> </a> <p> </p> <p>A new, interactive, online tool for visualising data and trends in the international trade in endangered species is being launched today. <a href="https://tradeview.cites.org/"><strong>CITES Wildlife TradeView</strong></a> is a joint project between the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). It is available in English, French and Spanish.</p> <p><img alt="screenshot_WildlifeTrade_Review" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="01218526-ae4b-48dd-be34-cbc17b51e345" height="265" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/screenshot_WildlifeTrade_Review_1.png" style="padding-left: 10px; padding-bottom: 10px;" width="336" class="align-right" loading="lazy" />The purpose of <strong>CITES Wildlife TradeView</strong> is to provide users with an accessible window into the world of CITES trade data and to showcase the main trading countries, species, commodities, sources and trends over time. The platform will bolster transparency and help achieve a broader understanding of the international trade in CITES-listed wildlife. </p> <p><strong>CITES Wildlife TradeView</strong> is dynamically linked with the <a href="https://trade.cites.org/">CITES Trade Database</a>, a key resource for monitoring trade in the species listed in the Convention’s Appendices. This means the new platform will show the latest information as new data is uploaded into the Database.</p> <p>The CITES Trade Database contains the official data provided by all Parties to the Convention in their mandatory annual reports. It currently includes over 23 million records gathered from these reports since CITES entered into force in 1975. </p> <p>The Database will remain the official location where CITES trade data will be stored and accessed, while the purpose of <strong>CITES Wildlife TradeView</strong> is to quickly visualise specific aspects of its data, which can be used for obtaining an overview that can be showcased in presentations or communication activities. </p> <p><img alt="https://trade.cites.org/" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="41a51ec7-bce1-4e7e-a040-253876868567" height="300" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/screenshot_WildlifeTrade_Review_2.png" style="padding-right: 10px; padding-bottom: 10px;" width="319" class="align-left" loading="lazy" />The platform provides three tailored dashboards, enabling users to visualise trends in international wildlife trade in the following ways:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Global overview</strong>: providing a high-level overview of global trade in CITES-listed species</li> <li><strong>Country view</strong>: exploring the CITES trade for one or more countries</li> <li><strong>Taxon view</strong>: exploring the CITES trade data for one or more species or taxonomic groups (e.g. by searching ‘Grey Parrot’ or looking at all birds)</li> </ul> <p>Kelly Malsch, Head of Nature Conserved at UNEP-WCMC, said: “<em>The CITES Wildlife TradeView platform will help make CITES trade data more accessible and easier to grasp, even if you are not a data expert. This will, in turn, help monitor, analyse, and communicate this important dataset on the international trade in wildlife, supporting global conservation efforts.</em>” </p> <p>Sofie Flensborg, Officer-in-Charge of the CITES Secretariat’s Outreach and Projects Unit, said: "<em>With the launch of the CITES Wildlife TradeView, the capacity for monitoring the trade in CITES-listed species has just taken a leap forward. This is particularly important, not just in the context of CITES implementation, but also for wider global commitments to safeguard biodiversity. As we work to tackle the global biodiversity crisis, CITES Wildlife TradeView will play a crucial role in bringing important biodiversity data to light and ensuring that wildlife trade is legal and sustainable. We are grateful to UNEP-WCMC for their effort in making this user-friendly interface.</em>”</p> <p>The development of this new wildlife trade visualisation platform was made possible through the financial support from the UK Research and Innovation’s Global Challenges Research Fund under the <a href="https://tradehub.earth/">TRADE Hub project</a>.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Wed, 09 Mar 2022 11:22:36 +0100 vdhalladoo 130726 Happy International Women&#039;s Day 2022! http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130720_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p>CITES is in Lyon for International Women's Day. On this March the 8th, the women delegates wish you a very Happy International Women's Day 2022.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Tue, 08 Mar 2022 10:39:35 +0100 davidw 130720 Secretary-General&#039;s Opening Statement to the 74th Meeting of the CITES Standing Committee http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130718_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <h1 class="text-align-center">Secretary-General's Opening Statement to the 74th Meeting<br /> of the CITES Standing Committee</h1> <p> </p> <p>Mr Jean Patrick Le Duc, chief of delegation of France and Chair of the European Council,</p> <p>Mr Pierre Athanaze, Vice President of the Metropole,</p> <p>Ms Carolina Caceres, Chair of the CITES Standing Committee,</p> <p>Distinguished Standing Committee Members, Parties, observers, Ladies and Gentlemen</p> <p>Good morning to all. I am grateful to Her Excellency Barbara Pompili, Minister of Ecological Transition of France for her thoughtful video, and sorry that her excellency Bérangère ABBA, State Secretary for biodiversity, is ill. We wish her a speedy recovery.</p> <p>I’m so very pleased that we are all able to be here together, in person, thanks to the generosity of our hosts, the Metropole of Lyon and the French Government. When we asked if there was any Party that was willing or able to host us in the these trying COVID times, we were thrilled that you came forward to offer us the chance to meet in this way. A special thank you to Mr Jean Patrick Le Duc who worked tirelessly to ensure this meeting could take place in Lyon. It seems that any conference or meeting that is worth attending recently, either has been or will be happening in France. That is of course until we get to our own Conference of the Parties in Panama in November. And it is to CoP19 that we must look toward. One of the most important objectives of this meeting is to advise and inform the CoP and support it to take the decisions it must take at this crucial time.</p> <p>The agenda for this Standing Committee is jam-packed and covers a wide variety of issues. It will be a genuine challenge to get through the workload and we are lucky to have such an able, experienced and knowledgeable Chair to guide us through the next five days. You may need to think carefully about the</p> <p>I would also recall that the success or otherwise of this meeting depends on us all collectively. We make a commitment when we come here – a commitment always to remember the importance of what it is we are doing and that each agenda item contributes to how efficiently, how constructively and how wisely you advise Parties and the CoP in the management of our endangered wild fauna and flora. We have all come a long way to put ourselves in this position and each of us is worthy of attention and respect. We must work with diligence but without delay. There are 89 items for your consideration. 117 related documents, more than 5 thousand pages. I hope it is not too brazen of me to ask you to thank my colleagues at the CITES Secretariat, the Chairs of the scientific committees and the chairs of the intersessional working groups for their hard work in preparing these documents.</p> <p>The meeting is taking place during a month where there is a strong focus on environmental matters. With UNEA adopting for example a resolution to end plastic pollution and forge an international legally binding agreement by 2024; and, as mentioned by Minister Pompili and Mr Le Duc, the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity and stakeholders meeting the week after SC74 to discuss the post-2020 global biodiversity framework.</p> <p>The 74<sup>th</sup> meeting of the Standing Committee is the CITES communities’ contribution to move the global environmental agenda forward and towards the fulfilment of the CITES strategic vision agreed by the Parties.</p> <p>We should also keep in mind that we do not work in isolation. Last week was an excellent example of this. World Wildlife Day brought messages of support flooding in from the public and from the international community and NGOs, who are as invested in our success as we are. They know that our goals are all interlinked. Sustainable development, conservation of biodiversity and the sustainable use of the components of biodiversity will not happen without a concerted, coordinated multilateral effort. It won’t happen without us. The world is looking to us and has confidence in us to play our part in addressing these challenges.</p> <p>I wish you a productive five days and an enjoyable five days. It is certainly an important five days. I know you will make the most of them and work in harmony with each other so that we can live in harmony with nature.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 07 Mar 2022 15:50:59 +0100 davidw 130718 SC74 gets going in Lyon http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130714_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p> </p> <p>To access the livestreams on YouTube, please click below:</p> <p>English: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/c/cites/live">https://www.youtube.com/c/cites/live</a></p> <p>Français: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzebQLSOE7VlCpoeCCiypCA/live">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzebQLSOE7VlCpoeCCiypCA/live</a></p> <p>Español: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqON-y6bW0iBYLleBo-7Q_A/live">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqON-y6bW0iBYLleBo-7Q_A/live</a></p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Mon, 07 Mar 2022 08:44:54 +0100 vdhalladoo 130714 World Wildlife Day International Youth Art Contest Announces Yanjun Mao of China as 2022 Winner http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130712_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p> </p> <p><strong>JOINT PRESS RELEASE</strong></p> <p><img alt="partner logos youth art ifaw CITES UNDP" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2dafed4f-69a0-46b7-848d-ed0e56139570" height="174" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Patner%20logos%20for%20PR.png" width="478" loading="lazy" /></p> <h1> </h1> <p><strong>Geneva/New York/Washington DC, 3 March 2022 - </strong>With a piece entitled “Return Home”, 13-year old Yanjun Mao from China has been selected from over 1,500 entries received from 58 different countries as the winner of the <a href="https://wildlifeday.org/">World Wildlife Day</a> 2022 International Youth Art Contest. Under the theme of “Recovering Key Species for Ecosystem Restoration”, this year marks the fourth annual contest held in conjunction with <a href="http://www.ifaw.org/">IFAW</a> (International Fund for Animal Welfare), Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (<a href="https://cites.org/eng">CITES</a>), and the United Nations Development Programme (<a href="https://www.undp.org/">UNDP</a>). </p> <p>In 2013, the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed March 3rd as World Wildlife Day, an annual celebration to raise awareness of the world’s wild fauna and flora. Yanjun received official recognition as part of today’s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/c/WorldWildlifeDay2022">virtual celebration</a>. The award was introduced by renowned wildlife and conservation artist <a href="https://www.sophiegreenfineart.com/">Sophie Green</a>.</p> <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'filter_caption' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'themes/contrib/bootstrap_barrio/templates/content-edit/filter-caption.html.twig' --> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-left"> <img alt="Age_13-CHINA-303-287-Yanjun-CN.jpg " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5613b808-3c94-443e-94c2-fd5a5d3c363a" height="166" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Age_13-CHINA-303-287-Yanjun-CN.jpg" width="295" loading="lazy" /> <figcaption>'Return Home', Yanjun Mao's winning entry.</figcaption> </figure> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'themes/contrib/bootstrap_barrio/templates/content-edit/filter-caption.html.twig' --> <p>Drawing attention to endangered as well as critically endangered wildlife while highlighting the power of conservation efforts, this year’s theme and contest tap into the creativity of global youth artists, encouraging them to embrace their sense of stewardship through conservation while also raising awareness of the threats faced by so many of the world’s species today. </p> <p>Through vibrant artworks that depict a stunning range of ecosystems and endangered wildlife from elephants to orangutans to polar bears, thirteen semi-finalists were selected by a panel of judges which included representatives from IFAW, CITES, and UNDP, and guest judges including celebrated syndicated cartoonist Jim Toomey, journalist and documentary filmmaker David Abel, Chief Brand Officer &amp; Creative Director for Munchkin, Inc. Diana Barnes (db), and Jackson Wild Executive Director Lisa Samford.</p> <p>“The talent displayed as well as the overall response from this year’s contest was extraordinary,” said Danielle Kessler, U.S. Director of IFAW. “Choosing one winner was no easy task for this year’s panel. Generating nearly three times the number of entries as in past years, the depictions of both flora and fauna created by such young artists not only exquisitely captures this year’s theme, but also vividly reflects their deep sense of connection to the natural world. It is an honor to continue hosting this global international contest that provides them with a platform for such expression.” </p> <p>“I’m very pleased to congratulate our winner Yanjun,” said CITES Secretary-General, Ivonne Higuero, “and I would also like to recognize the talent and commitment of all our entrants. It is uplifting to see so many young people, from so many countries, engage with this year’s theme of “Recovering Key Species for Ecosystem Restoration”. It is clear that our young people appreciate the conservation challenges we face but with their support, energy and passion, I’m sure we will reach our goals for this UN Decade for Ecosystem Restoration.”</p> <p>"UNDP would like to warmly congratulate Yanjun Mao,” said Midori Paxton, Head of Ecosystems and Biodiversity at the United Nations Development Programme. “His painting captures not just the interconnectedness between humans and our natural world, but how a young person might see their place in it - smaller and more surrounded by nature than our global societies seem to assume, and yet wanting to help, despite the enormity. In a year when the theme of World Wildlife Day is “Recovering Key Species for Ecosystem Restoration”, it offers a beautiful, timely message.”<br /> The winning artwork, “Return Home”, as well as all the finalist’s entries, are currently viewable on the <a href="https://www.ifaw.org/campaigns/world-wildlife-day-youth-art-contest-2021-finalists">IFAW website</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-center">---</p> <p>For more information and to arrange interviews, please contact:<br /> IFAW: Abby Cohen (Rosen Group) at +1 973-224-0403 or abby@rosengrouppr.com <br /> CITES: David Whitbourn at +41 79 477 0806 or david.whitbourn@un.org  <br /> UNDP: Sangita Khadka at +1 212 906 5043 or sangita.khadka@undp.org <br />   </p> <p class="text-align-center">---</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><u>About IFAW</u></strong><br /> The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) is a global non-profit helping animals and people thrive together. We are experts and everyday people, working across seas, oceans, and in more than 40 countries around the world. We rescue, rehabilitate, and release animals, and we restore and protect their natural habitats. The problems we’re up against are urgent and complicated. To solve them, we match fresh thinking with bold action. We partner with local communities, governments, non-governmental organizations, and businesses. Together, we pioneer new and innovative ways to help all species flourish. See how at ifaw.org.</p> <p><strong><u>About CITES</u></strong><br /> The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was signed on 3 March 1973 and entered into force on 1 July 1975. With 183 Parties (182 countries + the European Union), it remains one of the world's most powerful tools for wildlife conservation through the regulation of international trade in over 38,000 species of wild animals and plants. CITES-listed species are used by people around the world in their daily lives for food, health care, furniture, housing, tourist souvenirs, cosmetics or fashion. CITES seeks to ensure that international trade in such species is sustainable, legal and traceable and contributes to both the livelihoods of the communities that live closest to them and to national economies for a healthy planet and the prosperity of the people in support of UN Sustainable Development Goals.</p> <p><strong><u>About UNDP</u></strong><br /> UNDP is the leading United Nations organization fighting to end the injustice of poverty, inequality, and climate change. Working with our broad network of experts and partners in 170 countries, we help nations to build integrated, lasting solutions for people and planet. Learn more at undp.org or follow at @UNDP.</p> <p><br /> <strong><u>About the United Nations World Wildlife Day</u></strong><br /> On 20 December 2013, the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 3 March as World Wildlife Day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild fauna and flora. The date is the day of the signature of the <a href="http://www.cites.org/eng/disc/text.php" target="_blank" title="About CITES">Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora</a> (CITES) in 1973. World Wildlife Day has quickly become the most prominent global annual event dedicated to wildlife. It is an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and varied forms of wild fauna and flora and to raise awareness of the various challenges faced by these species. The day also reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime, which has wide-ranging economic, environmental and social impacts.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Fri, 04 Mar 2022 11:40:05 +0100 vdhalladoo 130712 World Wildlife Day Film Showcase Announces Winners for 2022 http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130709_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p><strong><span id="cke_bm_67S" style="display: none;"> </span></strong></p> <p><strong>JOINT PRESS RELEASE</strong></p> <p><img alt="CITES, Jackson Wild, UNDP logos" class="text-align-center align-left" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0c8634af-7a34-4665-b042-7601dbc23120" height="120" src="/sites/default/files/articles/Logos_for_Film_PR.png" width="408" loading="lazy" /></p> <p><img alt="UNCMS logo.PNG " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="d2ee8863-4f7e-4754-8a62-192a95b07106" height="108" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/UNCMS%20logo.PNG" width="108" class="align-left" loading="lazy" /></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Geneva/Jackson Hole, WY /New York, 3 March 2022</strong>. - Jackson Wild™ has announced the 2022 winners for the World Wildlife Day Film Showcase, which features films that align with this year’s World Wildlife Day Theme: Recovering Key Species for Ecosystem Restoration. The showcase was organized by the Jackson Wild, The Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).</p> <p>“As we live in a world that has become increasingly isolated over the past two years, powerful stories can connect us with each other, as well as ignite the spirit of sustainability and conservation in new audiences,” said Lisa Samford, Executive Director of Jackson Wild. “Our hope is that these stories demonstrate that despite the immense challenges we face, there are ongoing efforts and successful models to look to, as communities work to build a sustainable, conservation-driven future.”</p> <p>“In 2022, we must finally dispel the false dichotomy that there is a ‘zero-sum game’ of wildlife versus livelihoods; or protecting ecosystems versus the economy, “ said Midori Paxton, Head of Biodiversity and Ecosystems, UNDP. “This year's World Wildlife Day theme, and this showcase of powerful films, is an opportunity to reinforce the message that we must invest in the protection and restoration of ecosystems as part of effective solutions to respond to closely linked crises of poverty, global health, biodiversity loss, and the changing climate." </p> <p>“At its best, film has the ability to provoke our emotions and move us to action,” says CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero, “In these captivating films, each of our winners has  shown they can do that in the service of conservation. I congratulate them and urge them to keep working to meet our shared goals of ecosystem restoration.” </p> <p>Finalist films are available to <a href="https://watch.eventive.org/worldwildlifeday/">screen for free until May 15th</a> in the hopes of continuing to spread the message that species restoration is essential to human’s social and economic well-being, in addition to the planet’s environmental health. </p> <p><u><strong>World Wildlife Day 2022 Film Showcase Winners:</strong></u></p> <p><strong>The Web of Life (Long Form) </strong>Sponsored by: HHMI Tangled Bank Studios<br /> <em>The Otter, A Legend Returns</em><br /> Hilco Jansma Productions, EO (Evangelische Omroep), In cooperation with Ispida Wildlife Productions</p> <p><strong>The Web of Life (Short Form)</strong> Sponsored by: HHMI Tangled Bank Studios<br /> <em>The Common Ground</em><br /> Conor Ferris, National Film and Television School</p> <p><strong>Stories of Hope (Long Form)</strong> Sponsored by: Terra Mater Factual Studios<br /> <em>Endangered</em><br /> The Natural History Unit BBC Studios and A Very Good Production for Discovery+</p> <p><strong>Stories of Hope (Short Form)</strong> Sponsored by: Terra Mater Factual Studios<br /> <em>Mexico City and its Sacred Salamanders</em><br /> bioGraphic, Katie Garrett</p> <p><strong>Species in Crisis (Long Form)</strong> Sponsored by: Discovery<br /> <em>Sea of Shadows</em><br /> Terra Mater Factual Studios in association with Appian Way, Malaika Pictures, The<br /> Wild Lens Collective for National Geographic Documentary Films</p> <p><strong>Species in Crisis (Short Form)</strong> Sponsored by: Discovery<br /> <em>Last Wild Places: Majete</em><br /> National Geographic Society Impact Media Lab</p> <p><strong>People &amp; Threatened Species (Long Form) </strong>Sponsored by: San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance<br /> <em>The Witness is a Whale</em><br /> A co-production of Spindrift Images, Terra Mater Factual Studios and Mark<br /> Fletcher Productions</p> <p><strong>People &amp; Threatened Species (Short Form)</strong> Sponsored by: San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance<br /> <em>Wild Innovators: Beyond the Boma</em><br /> Wild Elements Studios</p> <p><strong>Micro Movie Sponsored by: Burgenland</strong><br /> <em>The Turtleman</em><br /> Jigar Ganatra, African School Of Storytelling<br /> Wake Up &amp; Smell the Flowers<br /> Yaz Ellis</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><u>About CITES</u></strong><br /> The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was signed on 3 March 1973 and entered into force on 1 July 1975. With 183 Parties (182 countries + the European Union), it remains one of the world's most powerful tools for wildlife conservation through the regulation of international trade in over 38,000 species of wild animals and plants. CITES-listed species are used by people around the world in their daily lives for food, health care, furniture, housing, tourist souvenirs, cosmetics or fashion. CITES seeks to ensure that international trade in such species is sustainable, legal and traceable and contributes to both the livelihoods of the communities that live closest to them and to national economies for a healthy planet and the prosperity of the people in support of UN Sustainable Development Goals.</p> <p><br /> <strong><u>About UNDP</u></strong><br /> UNDP is the leading United Nations organization fighting to end the injustice of poverty, inequality, and climate change. Working with our broad network of experts and partners in 170 countries, we help nations to build integrated, lasting solutions for people and planet. Learn more at undp.org or follow at @UNDP.</p> <p><br /> <strong><u>About Jackson Wild</u></strong><br /> For almost 30 years, the Jackson Wild Summit has grown a reputation for hosting extraordinary convenings science, nature and conservation media stakeholders. The World Wildlife Day Film Showcase brings together stakeholders from all over the world to focus on a single global theme. Jackson Wild’s international board members include: ARTE France, BBC Studios, Blue Ant Media / Love Nature, Borealés, Conservation International, Discovery, Doclights, FujiFilm Optical Devices - Fujinon Lenses, Gorongosa Restoration Project, HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, Humane Society International, International Fund for Animal Welfare, National Geographic Partners, National Geographic Society, Nature/WNET, Netflix, Off the Fence Productions, ORF/Universum, PBS, Saint Thomas Productions, San Diego Zoo, Seeker, Smithsonian Channel, Sony Electronics, SVT - Swedish Television, The Nature Conservancy, Terra Mater Factual Studios, Vulcan Productions, Wanda Films, WGBH, and World Wildlife Fund US.</p> <p><br /> <strong><u>About the United Nations World Wildlife Day</u></strong><br /> On 20 December 2013, the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 3 March as World Wildlife Day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild fauna and flora. The date is the day of the signature of the <a href="http://www.cites.org/eng/disc/text.php" target="_blank" title="About CITES">Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora</a> (CITES) in 1973. World Wildlife Day has quickly become the most prominent global annual event dedicated to wildlife. It is an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and varied forms of wild fauna and flora and to raise awareness of the various challenges faced by these species. The day also reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime, which has wide-ranging economic, environmental and social impacts.</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Fri, 04 Mar 2022 09:33:52 +0100 vdhalladoo 130709 UN issues 12 stamps illustrating endangered species in Central &amp; South America and the Caribbean http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130705_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p class="text-align-right">For use of the media only;<br /> not an official document.</p> <img alt="cites un stamps logo" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="791c8a4e-29bf-422c-bc1d-b9917ad6273f" height="110" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cites-un-stamps-2022_0.png" style="&#10; align-content: center;&#10; display: block;&#10; margin-left: auto;&#10; margin-right: auto;" width="322" class="align-center" loading="lazy" /> <p class="text-align-center"><strong>JOINT PRESS RELEASE</strong></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Geneva/New York/Vienna, 3 March 2022 </strong>– Twelve new, colorful and original stamps are being launched today as part of the United Nations Endangered Species Stamps series. The stamps are issued by the United Nations Postal Administration (UNPA) and the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). They highlight species native to the Central and South American and Caribbean region, including Panama, which will host the next triennial World Wildlife Conference this November (CITES CoP19).</p> <p>This 29<sup>th</sup> annual edition of the UN Endangered Species Stamps series is being launched on World Wildlife Day which this year has the theme of ‘Recovering key species for ecosystem restoration’. They are available online at <a href="http://www.unstamps.org">www.unstamps.org</a> and in-person from shops at the UN headquarters in New York, Geneva and Vienna.</p> <p>A mix of mammals, plants, birds, amphibians, reptiles and insects is represented. Some of the species are included in Appendix II of CITES, which uses a rigorous system of trade permits to ensure that trade in such species remains legal and sustainable. Others are listed on Appendix I, which bans or highly restricts trade in such species, considered to be threatened by extinction.</p> <img alt="un stamps wwd cites 2022" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="664fef55-ed54-4bd1-b02e-66400baa43d2" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/un-stamps-s2.png" style="&#10; align-content: center;&#10; display: block;&#10; margin-left: auto;&#10; margin-right: auto;&#10;" class="align-center" width="900" height="220" loading="lazy" /> <p>The stamps were illustrated by Fernando Correia. This is his second set of stamps of endangered species for the United Nations. He has been a professional scientific illustrator for more than thirty years, winning multiple awards. His work has been in more than sixty exhibitions in the United States and across Europe, including his native Portugal. Fernando trained as a biologist, holds a Masters in Animal Ecology and has published more than a hundred and fifty papers on biology and scientific illustration.</p> <p>The following species are featured on the stamps:</p> <ul> <li>The <strong>Andean condor</strong> (<em>Vultur gryphus</em>, listed in Appendix I) is the largest flying bird in the world as measured by its combined weight and wingspan.</li> <li>The <strong>jaguar</strong> (<em>Panthera onca</em>, Appendix I) is endangered by habitat loss and poaching.</li> <li>The <strong>pygmy three-toed sloth</strong> (<em>Bradypus pygmaeus</em>, Appendix II) is native to a small island off the coast of Panama and is considered critically endangered.</li> <li>The <strong>keel-billed toucan</strong> (<em>Ramphastos sulfuratus</em>, Appendix II), the national bird of Belize, is threatened by habitat loss and the international pet trade.</li> <li><strong>Staghorn coral</strong> (<em>Acropora cervicornis</em>, Appendix II) populations are declining throughout their few remaining habitats in the Caribbean.</li> <li>The <strong>manta de monk</strong> (<em>Mobula munkiana</em>, Appendix II), a species of ray native to the tropical and coastal waters of the Pacific, often caught as bycatch by fishing boats.</li> <li>The <strong>polkadot poison frog</strong> (<em>Oophaga arborea</em>, Appendix II) is native to Panama and is critically endangered.</li> <li>The <strong>Grenadines clawed gecko</strong> (<em>Gonatodes daudini</em>, Appendix I) is endemic to the islands of St Vincent and the Grenadines and is threatened by the international pet trade.</li> <li>The <strong>Satanas beetle</strong> (<em>Dynastes satanas</em>, Appendix II) of Bolivia has declined due to collecting and habitat loss.</li> <li>The <strong>night-blooming cereus</strong> (<em>Hylocereus triangularis</em>, Appendix II), a kind of cactus with fragrant flowers and edible fruit, has been overharvested in the wild.</li> <li><strong>Cedar</strong> trees (<em>Cedrela odorata</em>, Appendix II) are commercially valuable and subject to overharvesting.</li> <li>The <strong>barbwire apple-cactus</strong> (<em>Acanthocereus tetragonus,</em> Appendix II) is edible and is also collected as an ornamental plant.</li> </ul> <p>“The South and Central America and Caribbean region is rich in biodiversity. It is home to some of the world’s most beautiful and remarkable wild species,” said CITES Secretary-General Ivonne Higuero. “These new stamps from the United Nations Postal Administration will help to raise awareness of the region’s many endangered animals and plants and highlight the need to ensure that trade in these species is legal, traceable and sustainable.”</p> <p>Thanawat Amnajanan, Chief of the United Nations Postal Administration said: “It is a great honor to work with the CITES Secretariat and with talented artists to illustrate and highlight these unique but endangered species on United Nations stamps each year. The United Nations Endangered Species stamp series is very popular and highly sought after by collectors. We look forward to presenting some new, beautiful stamps at the 50<sup>th</sup> anniversary of CITES in 2023.”</p> <p>---</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact: </strong></p> <p>David Whitbourn, CITES Secretariat – <a href="mailto:cites-media@cites.org">cites-media@cites.org</a> and +41 79 477 0806.<br /> Rorie Katz, Global Head of Graphics and Communications at UN Postal Administration – katzr@un.org</p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Thu, 03 Mar 2022 09:15:34 +0100 shashika 130705 World Wildlife Day celebrated across the globe on 3 March http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130697_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p class="text-align-center"><img alt="WWD2022" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="9a36bb21-6fff-48ca-b3f5-a5fd064f4da6" height="191" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/WWD_banner.png" width="1129" loading="lazy" /></p> <p class="text-align-center"><strong>PRESS RELEASE</strong></p> <p>The fate of animal and plant species and the ecosystems that depend on them is at the heart of this year’s UN World Wildlife Day. </p> <p>The theme of “Recovering key species for ecosystem restoration” identifies individual species like the Saiga antelope and California condors, as well as groups of species, including corals and seaweed, as the glue that holds their ecosystems together. These species’ wellbeing is thus crucial to conserve the biodiversity we have left and restore what has been lost, which is the focus of this year and part of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. </p> <p>“In 2022, we must finally dispel the false dichotomy that there is a ‘zero-sum game’ of wildlife versus the economy; or protecting ecosystems versus the economy,“ said UNDP Administrator, Achim Steiner. “Indeed, the world is waking up and recognising the true value of nature which holds many of the solutions we need to address the climate crisis and achieve the Global Goals.” </p> <p>Ivonne Higuero, the Secretary-General of CITES (The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), said: “World Wildlife Day is a chance to celebrate the successes in animal and plant conservation but at the same time acknowledge the critical challenges we face in conserving earth’s biodiversity and the ecosystems on which we depend. These key species play a vital role in ensuring ecosystem health. This is why species conservation and actions to restore ecosystems must go hand-in-hand.” </p> <p>World Wildlife Day has become the most prominent global annual event dedicated to wildlife. On Thursday 3 March, at 14:00 CET, the Secretariat of CITES, the UN Development Programme (UNDP), Jackson Wild, the International Fund for Animal Welfare and other partner organizations will hold a live event on YouTube. The event will bring together people at the forefront of conservation. From a company who grows coral to restore dying reefs in the Caribbean to a vulture restaurant fighting for their conservation in Nepal. From fighting poaching in one of the world’s most war-torn areas to a First Nation Elder Chief from the Northwest Territories of Canada. </p> <p>The event will feature statements from the UN General Assembly’s President, Mr. Abdulla Shahid; the Minister of Environment of Panama, Mr. Milciades Concepción; UNDP Administrator, Mr. Achim Steiner; and Ms. Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary, Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). </p> <p>At the event, Jackson Wild will present the winners of this year’s World Wildlife Day Film Showcase – over 300 films from 34 have competed in five categories and the winners will be announced at the event. The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) will be announcing the winner of the World Wildlife Day 2022 International Youth Art Contest from among over 1500 entries from children in 58 countries. The event will be closed by a musical piece performed by the UN Chamber Music Society. </p> <p>Pre-Interview opportunities: To speak to any of the following speakers, in advance of March 3rd</p> <ul> <li> <p>Ivonne Higuero, Secretary-General, CITES</p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Ms. Adeline Jonasson, Elder Chief, Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation, Canada</p> </li> <li> <p>Mr. John Kahekwa, Founder, Pole Pole Foundation (POPOF), DR Congo </p> </li> <li> <p>Ms. Tarin Toledo Aceves, Researcher, The Institute of Ecology (INECOL), Mexico </p> </li> <li> <p>Mr. Sam Teicher, Co-founder and Chief Reef Officer at Coral Vita Farm, The Bahamas </p> </li> <li> <p>Mr. Dhanbhadur Chaudhary, Manager, Community-based Vulture Restaurant, Nepal </p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Ms. Lucy Coals, Project Support Officer, Project Seagrass, Thailand/Cambodia </p> </li> </ul> <p>Please contact: David Whitbourn, Communications at <a href="mailto:cites-media@un.org" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">cites-media@un.org</a> or +41 79 477 0806 </p> <p>Further information is on <a href="http://www.wildlifeday.org/" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">www.wildlifeday.org</a>.</p> <p>The event will be live on YouTube at 14:00 CET, March 3rd 2022: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/WorldWildlifeDay/live" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/user/WorldWildlifeDay/live</a>. </p> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Wed, 02 Mar 2022 12:13:14 +0100 vdhalladoo 130697 CITES Parties and observers meeting in Lyon ahead of the next World Wildlife Conference http://cites.org/__%3C%21--%20THEME%20DEBUG%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20THEME%20HOOK%3A%20%27views_view_field%27%20--%3E_%3C%21--%20BEGIN%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E_node/130692_%3C%21--%20END%20OUTPUT%20from%20%27core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig%27%20--%3E__ <!-- THEME DEBUG --> <!-- THEME HOOK: 'views_view_field' --> <!-- BEGIN OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> <p><strong><img alt="CITES SC74 logo" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ff4bb2f6-bb88-44ad-87cf-0d9b62ac38aa" height="306" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cites-sc74-logo_0.jpg" width="247" class="align-right" loading="lazy" />Geneva, 1 March 2022:</strong> One of the year’s most important meetings for the future of wildlife conservation is to take place in Lyon, France from 7 to 11 March.</p> <p>The Standing Committee to CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) will be looking at pressing issues that include assistance to Parties to effectively comply with the Convention through its tools to avoid overexploitation of wild species, how to track and manage specimens produced through biotechnology, more concerted action against the illegal trade in endangered species, work done on reducing global demand for illegally traded animal and plant products and how to better enforce the Convention.</p> <p>This, the seventy fourth meeting of the Standing Committee (SC74), will be also be considering the contribution that CITES could or should make to help reduce the risk of future zoonotic diseases – ones that can be transferred from animals to humans – that may be associated with international wildlife trade.</p> <p>The Standing Committee gives policy guidance and recommendations to CITES and is holding its five-day meeting ahead of the meeting of the Conference of the Parties in November (CoP19), where all 184 Parties to the Convention will meet in Panama.  </p> <p>CITES is an international, legally binding instrument that must be implemented and enforced by the 184 Parties (183 countries and the European Union) that have agreed to be bound by it. SC74 will be considering any measures that it may need to take to help Parties fulfil their obligations to the Convention. This could include trade suspensions for those that may not yet have put in place adequate legislation or carried out the scientific assessments required to authorize trade in listed species or who may be in violation of key provisions of the Convention that ensure trade in CITES-listed species is always sustainable, legal and traceable.</p> <p>SC74 will also be looking at ways to better engage with indigenous people and local communities. CITES Parties have recognized that the implementation of CITES decisions are better achieved with the engagement of indigenous people and local communities, especially those which are traditionally dependent on CITES-listed species for their livelihoods.</p> <p>In addition, a new study on the illegal trade in jaguars will be presented and issues related to tree species, elephants, rhinos, cheetahs, eels, totoaba, marine turtles, seahorses and pangolins will be discussed.</p> <p>The recent meeting of the Task Force on the illegal trade in CITES-listed trees will report to SC74. More than 30 percent of the world’s tree species are at risk of extinction and international trade in more than 500 tree species is regulated under CITES. Progress can and must be made on implementing and enforcing CITES provisions. We risk losing more and more of the diversity of tree species, with the consequent threat to biodiversity and the ecosystems that sustain human beings, as well as the consequences for climate change.</p> <p>The Chair of the Standing Committee, Carolina Caceres (Canada), highlighted the importance of the meeting, “I appreciate the efforts undertaken by all involved in making this meeting happen in Lyon and I am looking forward to working with Parties and observers on addressing the many important issues on the agenda of the Committee – it will be a critical milestone towards CoP19 in Panama in November of this year.” </p> <p>Ivonne Higuero, Secretary-General of CITES, said “the impressive agenda of the Standing Committee is a clear signal of the confidence that Parties and stakeholders are placing on the capacity and capability of the Convention and its entities to contribute to addressing the planetary biodiversity crisis; we are very excited to be able to meet in-person for the first time since CoP18 in Geneva in August 2019. “</p> <p><strong>Note to editors:</strong></p> <p>The CITES Secretariat can provide the contact details of experts to talk on any of the above issues, prior to the start of the Standing Committee meeting. The Secretariat will be providing updates on the discussions from Lyon and also able to provide specialists to talk about issues as they arise during the meeting.</p> <p>For further information or interview requests, please contact: David Whitbourn at +41 79 477 0806 or <a href="mailto:cites-media@un.org">cites-media@un.org</a></p> <p><strong>For Media Accreditation to the meeting, please follow <a href="https://cites.org/sites/default/files/eng/com/sc/74/SC74-media-accreditation.pdf" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">this link</a> and apply as soon as possible</strong></p> <p><strong>About CITES</strong></p> <p><em>With 184 Parties, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) remains one of the world's most powerful tools for wildlife conservation through the regulation of trade. Thousands of species are internationally traded and used by people in their daily lives for food, health care, housing, tourist souvenirs, cosmetics or fashion.</em></p> <p><em>CITES regulates international trade in over 38,000 species of plants and animals, including their products and derivatives, to ensure their survival in the wild with benefits for the livelihoods of local people and the global environment. The CITES permit system seeks to ensure that international trade in listed species is sustainable, legal and traceable</em> <em>and </em><em>contributes </em><em>to both the livelihoods of the communities that live closest to them and to national economies for a healthy planet and the prosperity of the people in support of UN Sustainable Development Goals</em><em>.</em></p> <p><em>CITES was signed in Washington D.C. on 3 March 1973 and entered into force on 1 July 1975.</em></p> <p><em>Learn more about CITES by visiting </em><a href="https://cites.org/eng/"><em>www.cites.org</em></a><em> or connecting to:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/CITES">www.facebook.com/CITES</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.flickr.com/CITES">www.flickr.com/CITES</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.twitter.com/CITES">www.twitter.com/CITES</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/c/CITES">www.youtube.com/c/CITES</a></li> </ul> <!-- END OUTPUT from 'core/modules/views/templates/views-view-field.html.twig' --> Wed, 02 Mar 2022 11:54:45 +0100 shashika 130692